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Rutabaga

What is Rutabaga?
Rutabaga, often termed as yellow turnips, actually bears the botanical name brassica napus, or brassica napobrassica. Also known by the name of swedish turnip, this root vegetable is quite popular in Northern European countries. Its leaves can also be eaten as a leaf vegetable.

Rutabaga looks very much like a turnip with yellow-orange flesh and ridges at its neck. It is a rich source of protein, vitamins and carbohydrates; and contains higher concentrations of folic acid, pantothenic acid, saturated and monounsaturated fats as well.

In Southern Europe, historical records and findings belonging to the seventeenth century suggest

that rutabaga was eaten as a vegetable as well as used for animal fodder. In America, rutabagas were first cultivated in the northern parts of the country in the early 1800s. Canada is one of the largest producers of the rutabaga in the world.
 

As a Fodder
For centuries, rutabagas have been cultivated as livestock feed in Canada and European countries. Regarded as the healthiest foods, this root vegetable is known for its delicate sweetness and flavor that hints of the light freshness of cabbage and turnip. As a fodder, it is commercially produced in Canada and the northern parts of the United States.

Since rutabagas are good sources of beta carotene, Vitamin A, and Vitamin C, they are regarded as the healthiest livestock and animal feeds. It also contains significant amount of monounsaturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, folic acid and pantothenic acid, thus regarded as a nutritious fresh fodder for livestock. Regular consumption of rutabaga enhances the overall performance as well health of animals. It increases milk production capacity, stamina and digestion.

nutritious fresh fodder for livestock. Regular consumption of rutabaga enhances the overall performance as well health of animals. It increases milk production capacity, stamina and digestion.
 
Nutritional Value
A rich source of nutrients, rutabaga contains a considerable amount of folic acid, pantothenic acid, saturated fat, monounsaturated fat and polyunsaturated fat. Every 100 grams or 3 1/2 ounces of raw rutabaga contains:
  • Calories: 36
  • Protein: 1.2 g
  • Carbohydrates: 8.1 g
  • Fiber: 2.5 g
  • Calcium: 47.0 mg
  • Copper: 0.04 mg
  • Iron: 0.52 mg
  • Magnesium: 23.0 mg
  • Manganese : 0.17 mg
  • Phosphorous: 0.58 mg
  • Potassium: 337.0 mg
  • Selenium: 0.7 mg
  • Sodium:20.0 mg
  • Zinc: 0.340 mg
  • Vitamin A: 580.0 IU
  • Vitamin B1 ­ Thiamine : 0.090 mg
  • Vitamin B2 ­ Riboflavin: 0.040 mg
  • Vitamin B3 ­ Niacin: 0.7 mg
  • Vitamin C: 25.0 mg.
 

As a Vegetable
For the last 200 years, this beta carotene-rich vegetable has been grown in many parts of the globe. It is actually a great tasting vegetable. One of the most traditional use of rutabaga is in preparing mash, a dish with potatoes, butter, and cream, made in both Scotland and Scandinavia. With its easy preparation and versatility, great nutrition, and excellent flavor, the rutabaga can easily become an endearing family favorite. Its leaves can also be eaten as a leaf vegetable.

 


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